Difference between Papaya and Papaw?


What is the Difference between Papaya and Papaw? – 2  summaries

Source: 30 bananas a day.com

Reply by Peter on November 3, 2012 at 6:25pmPapayaPapaw_3759-2_645_431_s

It is a little confusing for Australian consumers. There is a distinction in Australia between the two even though they both are known as the species papaya Carica.

To make things easier for consumers the agreed understanding in the Australian industry is that the red-fleshed sweeter fruit is called red papaya, while the yellow-fleshed fruit is called yellow papaw.

Papayas are oval shaped like a rugby or AFL football. The flesh should be pink or red when ripe. I consume them when they are blemished and soft. There are no GM papayas in Australia. All the papayas and paws paws sold in Australia are grown in Australia. Paws paws are generally shaped more like a soccer ball.

American pawpaw (note the different spelling) on the other hand is an entirely different fruit not related to the tropical Carica papaya from which Australian red papaya and yellow papaw come. American pawpaw is also known as ‘poor man’s banana’ and is the fruit of the Asimina triloba tree.

To complicate things further, there’s also green papaya, which is either red papaya or yellow papaw picked green. Green papaya is a sought after ingredient in Asian cuisine and is eaten as a vegetable.

PapayasbeingripenedI much prefer papayas. In fact I have a papaya tree in my front garden and this season I have harvested about 60 papayas.

Here are some of the papayas I harvested earlier this year.

 

Source: funtrivia.com

There is a distinct difference between the paw paw and papaya, being:images

Paw paw: yellow flesh and tends to be a larger fruit

Papaya: Orange to red flesh and usually a smaller oval or pear shaped fruit

Source: http://www.gtproduce.com.au/products.html
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Consumers have long been confused about the difference between these fruit and the fact is that while they are the same species Carica papaya, the fruit known as papaya looks and tastes quite different to the fruit known as papaw.

To make things easier for consumers the agreed understanding in the Australian industry is that the red-fleshed sweeter fruit is called red papaya, while the yellow-fleshed fruit is called yellow papaw.

American pawpaw (note the different spelling) on the other hand is an entirely different fruit not related to the tropical Carica papaya from which Australian red papaya and yellow papaw come. American pawpaw is also known as ‘poor man’s banana’ and is the fruit of the Asimina triloba tree.

To complicate things further, there’s also green papaya, which is either red papaya or yellow papaw picked green. Green papaya is a sought after ingredient in Asian cuisine and is eaten as a vegetable.

Source: http://www.horticulture.com.au/news/default.asp?act=detail&mode=&newsid=34


you might be interested:

1           how to choose non- GMO Papaya

2          GMO contamination of Papaw in Hawaii

3         Widespread GMO Contamination of Papayas in Hawaii

4         GE Papaya Causing Plenty Problems For Hawai’i 

5           Papaya Australia  Industry

PDF downloads

1         Growing Pawpaws by C.W. Benson and M. Poffley, formerly Horticulture Division, Darwin

2         The Biology of Carica papaya L. (papaya, papaw, paw paw) published by Australian Government

 


Carica Papaya (Papaya or Papaw)

 Source: eol.org

Carica papaya, papaya is a giant herbaceous plant–resembling a tree but not woody–in the Caricaceae (papaya family) that originated in Central America and is now grown in tropical areas world-wide for its large, sweet, melon-like fruits. The name “papaya” also refers to the fruit of other Carica species, including C. pubescens and C. stipulata, and their various hybrids.

Sometimes called paw-paw, although that name more typically applies to the species Asimona triloba, the papaya plant has a hollow, green or purple stem, and can grow 1.8 to 3 m (6 to 10 ft) in a year, eventually reaching heights of 6 to 9 m (20 to 30 ft). The long-petioled (stemmed) leaves, which may be 30 to 105 cm long (1 to 3.5 ft) and 30 to 60 cm (1 to 2 ft) wide, are deeply divided into 5 to 9 main segments, which are further lobed. Both leaves and stems contain large amounts of white, milky latex.

Papaya plants are generally dioecious, with short-stalked female (pistillate) flowers, which are 5-petalled, waxy, and white, borne on separate plants from the male (staminate) flowers, which are borne on long panicles (up to 1.8 m or 6 ft). Plants may also bear hermaphroditic or perfect flowers, which have both pistils and stamens, or they may be monoecious, bearing separate male and female flowers on the same plant. The fruit that develops varies in shape depending on the flower type. Fruits from female flowers are usually oval to round and smaller than the fruits that develop from perfect flowers, which are cylindrical or club-shaped, up to 50 cm (20 in) long and 20 cm (8 in) wide. The fruits, which can weigh up to 9 kg (20 lbs)—although common commercial cultivars generally produce fruits that weigh 0.5 to 2.25 kg (1 to 5 lbs)—and have a thin but tough waxy skin. Green fruits contain latex, which disappears as the fruit ripens to light or dark yellow. The flesh of the fruit varies from yellow to orange to red, and is thick and juicy, with a central cavity filled with many small black seeds.


Source: Daley’s Fruit 

Pawpaw – Grafted Southern Red

Red-Papaw-PapayaThis grafted  Paw Paw is dwarfed in size and the fruit is produced low to the ground. It is possible to have fruit within 4 months rather then taking 18 months from a seedling.

Pawpaw – Hawain Bisexual Yellow

Papaw-Papaya-Yellow-BisexualHeavy cropping papaya with small to medium sized sweet fruit. This Papaya selection is a true bisexual, consistently producing uniform bisexual plants. Grown on the Gold Coast from fruit brought back from Guam after 2nd World War by Jim Curren

Pawpaw – Red RD6 Hybrid

Red-Papaw-PapayaThis is a very fast growing red fleshed hybrid and will start picking 9 months after planting out as seedlings. The fruit is roundish with very clean skin all year and deep red flesh with a mild musk flavour.  2 plants per pot.  For more info go to: http://www.papayaseed.com.au/redorganicpapayaseed.htm

Pawpaw – Yellow YD1B Hybrid

Pawpaw-Yellow-YD1B-Hybrid-2449The most widely grown of all the hybrids in Australia, fruit is oblong, is very clean, flesh is firm, and is a medium yielding tree.  Hybrids are the result of crossing 2 “fixed” (stable) parent lines. Hybrids are more vigorous than their parents, produce more fruit and are less susceptible to disease. All papaya are affected by climatic changes but when grown under stable conditions hybrids are very consistent in fruit shape and size.
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